Tallies and Receipt Rolls

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Some years ago I read a paper before tbis Society on the Records of Exchequer Receipts from the English Jewry. At the time it was intended that this when published should be illustrated with plates of Tallies and Receipt Rolls, but owing to various circumstances, including the war, this was not done ; though the article duly appeared in the Society's VHIth Volume. The scheme of illustration has now been modified with the results shown in the accompanying plates.

Plate I. illustrates the earliest type of Receipt Roll, in single column, and shows a portion of the first purely Jewish one. Plate IT. gives us the development of the early single-columned type into a broader membrane with three columns arranged under Counties. Plate III. (a) shows yet another stage in the growth of the Receipt Roll. This is the Jewish membrane of a composite roll which includes also the ordinary Receipt Roll and the Liberate Roll (the roll of Writs for Issues), which in our Plate is seen turned over and rolled back at the head. Plate III. (b) introduces us to the final form of the Receipt Roll? a single-columned roll arranged under dates with Counties in the left hand margin. It is again an entirely separate roll for Jewish matters, and incidentally illustrates the dwindling size of such records towards the end of the medieval Jewish period in England ; our illustration showing the whole roll for one term.

Finally in Plate IV. we have examples of tallies.1 The first four of these relate to a talliage of twenty-thousand marks, and illustrate the cutting used for different amounts. The first two have Hebrew script upon them, in which respect they may be compared with those figured by Dr. Stokes in his Studies in Anglo-Jewish History. These inscriptions, kindly read for me by Dr. Abrahams, are, upon the first pip p J1?^ and upon the second (?) WpTJ b^J b?- Our fifth


 

1 See the article on " Tallies " in Archceologia, vol. 62.

example relates to a talliage of eight thousand marks and, with the sixth, is remarkable as having the county written upon it. The seventh relates to a tax of a third part upon moveables. The last two relate to Jewish matters other than taxation?debts in which Christians have an interest.

TRANSCRIPTS.

Plate I (Exchequer Accounts, K.R., 249/22) relates to the Northampton Donum, a transcript of which has been printed in the Society's Miscellanies (pp. lxx et seqq.) by Dr. Abrahams. It has been thought well to add tran? scripts of the portions of manuscript shown in the other Plates. They are as follows.1

Plate II.

(Receipt Roll 1564. Easter, 14 John)

[First Column]

BedeiovdSira et BukingHamSIRa.

De Milone de Wicumbe .xvij. s. de termino medie quadrage<s&me pro Judeismo.

De Henr^co Boesus [. . .] 2 .s. de termino Bancti Michaelis . pro eodem.

De Ricardo fih'o Osberti .xix. s. ij. d. de eodem termino.

De Eodem .xix. s. ij. d. pro eodem.

De Simone de pateshull' .xv. Ii. de fine Robert de Bros pro eodem.

Nortolcia et Suffolcia.

De

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