MOYSE HALL, BURY ST. EDMUNDS. WHENCE ITS NAME—WHAT IT WAS—WHAT IT WAS NOT

Moyse Hall, in the small town of Bury St. Edmunds, has been for nearly two centuries reputed to be an ancient synagogue, or Jews’ House or Hall. The words House and Hall are the same. Univer? sity Halls were called Houses or Halls, and, as you know, the words are interchangeable to-day. There are ten Halls in Oxford to-day, mostly bearing names of persons who endowed them, or in memory of whom they were erected. I hope to show you that this Jewish desig? nation is merely a misty tradition, for which I think I can fairly account. I must now let the building speak for itself as to age and date of erection. It is undoubtedly a late Norman or transition work; this gives a date between 1160 and 1200, with a few years’ variation. With this photograph and the pictures in the second volume of the Transactions of

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FRANK HAES

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