JOHN MAURICE SHAFTESLEY OBE, BA, FRSA 1901—1981

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cate and a fighter for justice - especially for justice to the Jewish people and to the Jewish religion. It was very sad that his last years should have been wracked by disability and by a long and painful illness. It was a privilege to have known him and to have sat at his feet.

Our late Vice-President and Editor was a Manches? ter man. He conceded London to be the capital, but I sometimes felt that he regarded this as a usurpa? tion. The influence upon him of his Mancunian origins and education was reinforced by the fact that it was in his native city that he learnt and first practised his special skills, and came to know from the inside about the making of newspapers. Before he joined the Jewish Chronicle in 1937 as assistant editor, he served on the staff of the Manchester Guardian and was a lecturer in the Department of Printing Technology at the Manchester College of Technology.

His knowledge, theoretical and practical, of all matters to do with typesetting and printing tech? nology and design was impressive. This Society greatly benefited from his expertise during his celebrated years as Editor of our publications. His meticulous attention to detail became proverbial to his colleagues. He had a no less unfailing regard to duty, even when other matters pressed upon him. These qualities equipped him with an infectious confidence in his own resourcefulness. This volume of Transactions was to have been published in his honour as a grateful tribute on his 80th birthday. It now appears in memoriam.

By temperament, he stood aside from all estab? lishments. Not even so prestigious an establishment as the Jewish Chronicle naturalized him. He carefully preserved his domesticity and light touch. His wry and knowing smile was part of his armoury. In 1946, this strikingly private man became editor of that important journal. It was a time of sharp political partisanship in the Anglo-Jewish com? munity. His was a calming influence. He had little taste for polemics, but it was not always easy to avoid them. His tenure coincided with great, rapid and worldwide changes in Jewish life and Jewish public relations, as well as in the patterns of leadership and of opinion in Anglo-Jewry. All of this he reflected, and to all of it he responded with undramatic pragmatism. The immediate post-war period was followed by new styles of commercial management in the newspaper world. Those were never his fields.

Nor did he profess to be in the line of the greatest editors. He never aspired to the wide communal impact of an Abraham Benisch, or to the provision of literary stimuli of an Asher Myers, or even to the political influence of a Leopold Greenberg. John Shaftesley was a mollifier, a consolidator, an encourager. He attained his own distinctive and chosen levels. In the ultimate roll-call he has his own niche, and it would have pleased him: that of the wise, home-spun mentor, whose reporters in Tel-Aviv, New York and South Shields

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