EARLY TRANSLATIONS AND TRANSLATORS OF THE JEWISH LITURGY IN ENGLAND

The first translation of a Hebrew book into a foreign language is said to have been attended with dismal portents. Three days of thick darkness followed upon the day when the first Greek version of the Pentateuch was ushered into the world. It was a day deemed to be as full of sinister import as that on which the golden calf was fashioned ; for that the Law could not be adequately translated into any foreign language. An annual fast (the 8th of Tebeth) was insti? tuted in mournful commemoration of the event.1

In such ways the forebodings found expression of devout and zealous men anxiously contemplating an event, the consequences of which were beyond their range of calculation. That there were men who did not share these misgivings, and who regarded every effort to make the Scriptures accessible to other than Hebrew-speaking peoples a legitimate means of pushing forward

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Written by

S. SINGER

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